Aphasia in West Greenlandic affects syntax but leaves morphology intact

Many linguists are interested in linguistic deficits (i.e. aphasia) that arise after brain injury. By investigating them, we can potentially infer something about how language is organised in people without brain damage – both which components comprise language and where the different components are located in the brain. We hope …

African languages in the 1700s Danish West Indies

Most of the Danish West Indian population during the colonial era did not come from Denmark, but had African roots. Even though the African languages only survived as traces in the creoles of the islands, we know that they were used (recessively) in the Virgin Islands for centuries. Danish slave …

How do learners make use of foreign language learning materials?

How do learners make use of foreign language learning materials? This was the question that I set out to answer in my ph.d. thesis. Along the way, I learned to use to methods for evaluating usability of a product (think-aloud protocols and constructive interaction), learned how to analyze the results …

Global live presentations on linguistics on the net: Lingoblogger featured on June 7th

Interested in language and linguistics? We thought so! Want to attend an almost three month long global event with talks from some of the world’s leading linguists for free? Of course you do! And now you can!

The Brazilian Linguistics Association (Abralin), in a joint project with the Permanent International

COVIDictionary. Your go-to dictionary in times of Coronavirus and COVID-19

Lingoblog.dk goes viral! Ideas worth spreading! Please send this link: https://www.lingoblog.dk/en/covidictionary-your-go-to-dictionary-in-times-of-coronavirus-and-covid-19/ to all your isolated friends, relatives and colleagues who can be uplifted by some COVID-19 humor.

by Peter Bakker and Joshua Nash

COVIDictionary 20: your go-to dictionary in times of Coronavirus and COVID-19

© Peter Bakker and Joshua …